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CSPAN
Dec 16, 2012 6:00pm EST
wealthiest men in america, merchants, among them, john hancock, yes, thee bold john hancock on the declaration of independence whose name is synonymous with signature. long before that, he was arguably the wealthiest merchant banker in america living on beacon hill with a commanding view of the massachusetts landscape and sea scape. far from espousing individual liberty, hancock and his fellow merchants in new england, governed their businesses and communities with economic ruthlessness that often left their competitors homeless and penniless. like today's tea party movement, the colonial tea party had almost nothing to do with tea. tea was nothing more than a social beverage for wealthy women. men seldom draping it, and it ranked below ail and rum among beverages americans consumed most. the tea party movement that sparked the american revolution actually began 20 years earlier in the 1750s and 1760s when new england business leaders like today's tea party supported a costly government war, but refused to pay higher taxes to cover the cost of that war. the war had started in the e
CSPAN
Dec 9, 2012 10:45pm EST
of allegiance. >> i pledge allegiance to the flag of the united states of america. and to the republic for which it stands, one nation, under god, indivisible with liberty and justice for all. thank you, please be seated. >> before we get started i'd like to have guests tonight. a date to begin with a welcome to one of the members of our board of trustees and the former governor of the state of california, pete wilson. governor. [applause] also with us tonight is our terrific congressman from houston guy really is retiring after 26 years. [applause] are scum her supervisor, foy. [applause] for the city who are patient enough to go through the book signing line, just prior to the event this evening coming in at this wonderful woman to see woman is here with us today. she's the best selling "new york times" best-selling author. it is a gentleman, please join me in welcoming calista gingrich. [applause] we have with us tonight a very special guest. i know that if i were simply to get the typical dinner circuit introduction speaker did newt gingrich, the one where you list every a
CSPAN
Dec 16, 2012 1:25pm EST
concerned women for america who still claims to be the largest women's political organizational in the united states and she based her organization on five spiritual principles in the bible the family and the patriotism the sanctity of marriage and safety of life and religious parents should have more control for example and what they're taught in school are doing that the equal rights amendment for the wedding was a violation of the fundamental orders of things and winning many of these cases. >> did you interview her for your bookracks. >> she is still in seclusion. she retired about almost 15 years ago and lives in california again. >> somebody would have liked to talk to? >> i would very much like to talk to her, and one of the things i think is really important is that an organization like hers which was so involved, so foundational to the conservative women political activism in the papers are not deposited anywhere. they are not available to be read. other women, if phillys schlaffley and the like beverley and the concerned women for america desert substantially more attention f
CSPAN
Dec 16, 2012 11:00pm EST
the moment of america's first antiwar movement actually coming into being. so there was antiwar sentiment during the revolution, and certainly during the war of 1812. that sentiment was limited. what you see happening in 1847 is a consensus, really, across the board. people from different regions of the country, soldiers in the field, officers, politicians, all of this fighting of the war that was being successfully waged in another country. so i think this is a very interesting moment in american history. and it takes place that people don't really know much about this timeframe. the u.s. and mexico war -- people don't write about it a lot. it doesn't have a big place in the historical imagination of americans. there is a number of reasons for that. it is often confused with the texas revolution or ignored altogether. when historians do talk about the us-mexico war, they tend to think about the war in relationship to the civil war. they narrated as sort of the first stop on the road to secession. arguing that the land it came from the close of the war was what really caused sec
CSPAN
Dec 23, 2012 12:00am EST
the slaves to latin america. arrived with the knowledge that issue was feared by the christian missionaries. the slaves adopted issue as their patron deity, just to scare the christians who wanted them to convert. issue became the paramount symbol of resistance in latin america and the americas. in fact, it went beyond that. in some parts of brazil, for instance, you find that issue has even been elevated to the supreme deity simply because that was a symbol that was there, the protagonist for freedom. as they find the transposition of deities across the atlantic, not minor, became not only the symbol of resistance in the new world, but the supreme deity in certain parts of brazil. like brazilla, for instance. if you go to the heartland of the europa in brazil, and it's quite plain. but in certain parts issue became the supreme deity. now, consider today -- this was the history of the missionaries in africa, and it goes back a couple of centuries. now, imagine that kadi -- to be a faller of the religion, is virtually to earn the death sentence in certain parts of nigeria. chris
CSPAN
Dec 30, 2012 7:15am EST
comes here to america to speak your. i think he has a good message. you're not supposed to be reading. >> i know. but there was something -- i have many more questions, but i think i will focus lastly on one issue that's been, comes out powerful in the book. i recall when you were talking about, it comes up in different ways. that when you're talking about the issue of jews from muslim countries, you mentioned, i guess you asked someone or someone was asked why didn't these jews make a big deal out of this. and one of the things, and one person responded, said we were just not about looking back. we were about starting over and rebuilding, and that's what we are today. i mean, it's true today that there's more of, there's an attempt to raise this issue. i think partially because people, it has a bearing on the question of the palestinian refugees, but otherwise, the people were not inclined really to raise it. it was more about getting on with life and building a new life. similarly, in an odd way not willing on death, which is another aspect of this, which even the death is v
CSPAN
Dec 25, 2012 6:00pm EST
, and south america and the various countries were beginning to rebel against spanish king and the french team and they were going to send and put down rebellions in english would keep the french from growing to south america. they invited americans to join in keeping the french out of south america because south america was rich with all the gold and silver. john quincy adams was secretary of state and said absolutely not, were not going to get involved in foreign wars. we're not going to let them come over here either. the seeds were planted for the monroe doctrine. it was part of monroe's annual message and he announced his cabinet for help in putting together some sort of statement, making our international policy clear. john quincy adams wrote the corporate vision of god. there are three long paragraphs that now call the monroe doctrine. he tells the europeans he does not want to get involved in wars. we don't want anything to do. you stay out of our affairs. the band of the colonial era had come to an end. you can no longer consider americas as father for colonial aspirations
CSPAN
Dec 22, 2012 12:00pm EST
and in favor to largely turning against the war. i see the u.s.-mexico war as the moment of america's first antiwar movement actually coming into being. there was anti-war sentiment during the revolution and certainly during the war of 1812, but that sentiment was limited. what you see happen is a consensus across the board. people from different regions of the country, soldiers in the field to officers, politicians, all the signing that a war that was being more less successfully waged in another country was wrong and actually protesting that war. i think this is an interesting moment in american history cover and it takes place in the world that people don't know much about. people don't write about it a lot. it does not have a big place in the historical imagination of americans, and there are a number of reasons for that. often confused with the texas revolution that happen before or ignored altogether. one historian stalker of the u.s.-mexico war, they tend to think about the war in relationship to the civil war. they merit the u.s.-mexico war as the first stop on the road to sec
CSPAN
Dec 16, 2012 7:00pm EST
latin america. they arrived with the knowledge that isu was geared by the christian missionaries. the slaves adopted isu. they adopted isu as their patron deity. the christians who wanted them to convert. isu became the paramount symbol of resistance in latin america. in the americas. in fact, it went beyond that. in certain part, you will find that isu has been elevated to the supreme deity. simply because that was a symbol that was there. the protagonist for freedom. and we find transition across the atlantic. it became not only a symbol of resistance in the new world, but the supreme deity in certain parts of the world. on the contrary, if you go to the heartland in brazil, it is quite plain. but in certain other parts, isu became the supreme deity. now, consider today, this is the history in africa. and this goes back a couple of centuries. to be a follower of this religion, it is virtually to earn a death sentence in certain parts of nigeria. christians also in the a death sentence in certain parts of nigeria. many christians respond in kind. but the level of intolerance, ba
CSPAN
Dec 24, 2012 5:00pm EST
thank them for all of their input. this book, "in the shadow of greatness" will help america to better understand the sacrificey and the courage of the brave men and women in the families of the greatest military force in the world. freedom is not free. god bless our military families in god bless america. [applause] [applause] [applause] >> thank you ,-com,-com ma lisa. thank you mrs. freeman. war brings sorrow and weakness, but through the challengechallenge s we face over the past 10 years, we also got stronger. and seth lynn my classmate who is a proud marine, a scholar from princeton, has gone on to do things in our nation is going to share those words with you and i'm grateful for his mission in the book and his contribution to this effort. [applause] >> the thanks, josh. like just set -- josh said i'm seth lynn director at gw university and our mission is to train veterans, some of the folks who have contributed to this incredible book to continue serving in public office. and it grew out of a nonprofit i started a few years ago called veterans campaign in my chapter in t
CSPAN
Dec 1, 2012 11:00pm EST
america's number one selling13 in. computer in the world. how much getting it at home for less in $200. how about getting free and yes virginia anything wanted to, net read, watch movies and the list goes on and on. the famous kindle fire and that is part we have planned for you tonight is 3 champac hours of goody but we want to get comfortable and cozy at home. coming up at the end of this hour we have concierge collection and i love only is it 3 flex payments but we have the final 2000 and when they're gone they're gone. these super magic loft mattress our water resistant and stain resistant and then we have a lowest priced advert in some of our hottest sheets to date. i wish we appeal of vision and i wish you could feel these. the pitcher does not do justice but the last time allegra had this on the air they sold out there were very popular and they were not as affordable. the sheets come with allow beautiful and brite and it feels like baby skin against you. also are selling a comforter set is coin to blow you away can you believe this? it is a comforter set for less than a hu
CSPAN
Dec 8, 2012 1:30pm EST
-- abolitionists that when he got back to america he was going to train slaves and settle them on land as sharecroppers in the '70s that they would become good citizens and free people in the united states but when he got back to the united states things change. >> you can watch this and other programs online at booktv.org. >> next on booktv, greg gutfield fox news's the five says liberals use manufactured our rage and artificial tolerance to deflect criticism of their political and social ideology. the author contends what he deems smart in tolerance should be used to counter liberal argument. it is about an hour. >> thank you. the first library i have been in where i haven't been asked to leave. i am not kidding, actually. i will get to that library joke in a minute. that was going to be my intro but during the signing nymex so many nice people when i was sitting there and are missing their going what would it be like if all of your fans were jerks? wouldn't that tell you something? if all of your fans -- i can't swear in the reagan library but if they were jerks, what if you were bill
CSPAN
Dec 26, 2012 12:45am EST
that image that you offered of america, this amazingly simple geographic place with all of these natural harbors and rivers that run the right way but that was true for thousands of years and didn't leave to the development to rate civilization and european civilization and began to make powerful use of those the geographical advantages are obvious, so help us think about why it's geography that we should focus on as opposed to the cultural or civilization will aspect. >> that was due to the development of the failing chips which enable the croswell landed voyages, so that development of technology while it is short in distance it did not negate, it made it more important because it opened up a whole new geography and the world trade system cultural and economics flow from the geography because what is culture? it is the accumulated experience of a specific people on may specifically and skate over hundreds of thousands of years that leads to tradition and habits that can be identifiable. one of the places i've always considered to have the most deeply denzel identifiable culture
CSPAN
Dec 9, 2012 7:00am EST
the decision in june of 1941, six months before pearl harbor brought america into world war ii, he made the decision that he wanted to fight the war against fascism, and went to england and enlisted as an officer candidate with the british army. he took with him for friends, another man who was a student at harvard, and three other guys who who had recently graduated and were doing what they could to help the cause of freedom and liberty against the forces of nazi fascism speaks that he was studying at harvard at the time. what was he studying and what was his life projector at that point? >> well, he, like his four brothers had grown up in new jersey and vermont where his family had had property for quite, several generations. he went to prep school at st. paul school where he distinguished himself as a student and as a student leader and as an athlete. and like all his brothers in his uncles and his grandfather's before him he went off to harvard. he was quite literary. he was a good writer. he was known as a good writer, and when he went to war he kept journals and wrote wonderf
CSPAN
Dec 23, 2012 6:00pm EST
war on poverty. some of the impetus for prioritizing the issue of poverty came from the of america. the best-selling study of poverty by the holy cross alumni michael harrington who found poverty hidden in appellation and in america's inner cities. shriver is accepted the challenge and got to work first of all research and the scope of the problem and its possible solutions. she found 30 million americans then living in poverty, and his agenda for them was and handouts employment through programs like the preschool head program, a dhaka court to retrain adults for in the dhaka the postindustrial economy and vista volunteers in service to america often described as a domestic peace corps. there were programs come stress and community leadership, global planning with federal funds, and there were legal services for the poor. in time, the war on poverty raised up resentment from some public officials who were challenged by the newly uncovered poor. meanwhile, slowly but inexorably, the war on vietnam drew the funding away from shriver's operation and offered a choice between war and a
CSPAN
Dec 31, 2012 1:00am EST
19th century with pre-civil rights? isn't america different now? is but powdery push ourselves to be inclusive? the only way to do it it is a fine way to talk about it. listening. not just talking. we wait our turn then we camber them but give in the other person's shoes. think about a white person who knows the witness does not have the same power it did 50 years ago. of browning of america produced the first black president and something about listening to that fear is legitimate and those in power have to give it up. we have to listen to the other side to figure out the common ground to push to a place we can feel good about what is possible if we come together and think critically of our past to imagine our future together. >> host: what type of class is to teach? >> guest: i do a lot of film. i am also a film maker. refocus on graduate courses for mediums for scholarships. they say they like the books but the only people there reid them are the scholars but in a film everybody will see the project. that is essential but also the idea if you think about the world and use film to
CSPAN
Dec 25, 2012 8:15pm EST
then i heard stories about sally ride. america's first female astronaut in space. why did nasa pick her? why sallie ride? some say because she is a physics jeepous, others say she was a great county, which she was, but they picked her because nasa took out an ad in her college newspaper and said, we're looking for female astronauts and will you come and sallie ride, saw on opportunity and seized. i it. and i want mid daughter do learn that lesson. if she wants something see has to go over at. and this book is a way to give her thor heroes, and dolly parton, rosa parks, amelia air hart sally ride. >> host: where are those two bottles of champagne? >> guest: good question. on the day got married we opened up the champagne. i was the sourest, worst tasting champagne i ever had but it was also the greatest glass of champagne because is was infused of the love of the 30 years of my dad and mom and the love they had for me. no question my champagne career is done but the book i did better with. >> host: in between writing "heroes for your son" and now "heroes for your daughter" your paren
CSPAN
Dec 8, 2012 12:00pm EST
that they know of in america. one of the things that helps is to be writers ourselves and to know what makes a writer comfortable, to respect a writer who has come for a visit and not treat that writer like some sort of circus side show. and to engage that person in conversation. we often like to say and joking among ourselves that we invite writers to dinner, and we just have these couple of public events on either side of the dinner or some gathering after one of those public events. what really happens is sitting down and having good conversation. it brings writers back. it's actually one of the things that people, i think, most appreciate about the writer's institute. writers will be respected as writers. i remember one writer saying, you know, you go to some literary readings, and you think, gosh, i'm so glad i got through that. let me, you know, catch the next plane out. you go to the writer's institute, and you find yourself saying, wow, that was good. i hope they invite me back. >> mom and dad were high school teachers, so we would take family vacations across the country.
CSPAN
Dec 29, 2012 9:00am EST
amateur," david limbaugh's "the great destroyer," charles kessler's i am the change, obama's america, quite critical of president obama. do these books sell well? >> they do largely because they serve rightly or wrongly as a counterpoint. many readers wish to buy into at and as a result of these books have a very active audience and president obama has been reelected, i am sure these publishers with conservative inference or conservatively inclined will predict to sell well and they will continue to appeal to an audience that demand these books. >> have you interviewed these critical of others? >> no. let's see. glen beck, but he is not recently taken on exactly president obama. sort of interesting. this is generally true, whoever's in power in the white house, the opposite political slant does better. liberal democrat in the white house, when there's a conservative in the white house, president bush, critical of the president and do better. it was being questioned about jobs or something and he said look what i'm doing for the book industry because there were so many books out, crit
CSPAN
Dec 25, 2012 12:30pm EST
to beautiful narrative that everybody could relate to and so she'd become one of america's most celebrated a beloved authors in the silent spring turned a very different direction. "silent spring" is a disturbing book, a worrisome book to point that what we were doing to ourselves by the careless use of pesticides in many different places. since it's not 1962 anymore, i thought i would explain more for you about who rachel carson was. she was born in 1907 in the house in springfield, pennsylvania. when a person was born in the upstairs bedroom of the house, at the time did not have the addition on the brick inside. very simple, very modest house, four runs. two downstairs and two bedrooms upstairs. there is no central heat, no indoor plumbing. data couple of couple of outhouses out that. a shed in the front of vacation i kept it worse and there was a little bit out of the west.??? there is enough property around the house that carson could explore the woods, often with her mother as a child and she looked birds and animals and was fascinated from a very early age. she was a g
CSPAN
Dec 2, 2012 7:30pm EST
america's sweetheart. america's number one selling 7 in. tablet computer because make no bones about it while this is fun, fast, easy,to 30 times faster.--browses parental controls. nd it islowest price in hsn history. that lowest price on a tablet computer for the rest of the year. 3 day, a time,a night, if you had your heart set a tablet tonneau is the night to call. you see that liquor? even my producer said we broke the clicker last night.--tonight is the night to call. fliclicker at 3:00 p.m. they have secured enough quantities to get through primetime. this is an abbreviated look. basically a 15 minutes presentation. preview to our last show at 9:00 p.m.. whatever it takes make your way to the telephones free shipping.less than $40 gets it home. you get everything you want from your simply to impress yes you can do photo editing, movies, multi media, entertainment. we include the usb connector to charge it through your computer. then we have the stylus and headset so you get everything. are the cases sold out? we deal? i love these is that pretty.that is the where did you get i
CSPAN
Dec 24, 2012 9:00am EST
write a book about, right history of strom thurmond's america, in a way that would in a critical but dispassionate way, a way that would shed light on some of the issues that have shaped each of our own america's today. and i hope that in doing so you can add, a measure of reason and passion to these issues that embroil our politics today, and that divide us so. so that was the goal. that's the mission as it were, but what are the big issues? one of the issues that a history of strom thurmond's americaspeaks to? we remember, a lot of us remember who strom thurmond was. strom thurmond was a 1948 presidential candidate. strom thurmond was one of the lead authors of the 1956 southern manifesto. this is the protest the supreme court decision in the brown v. board of education decision 1954. strom thurmond is a recordholder to this day of the longest one man filibuster. and again his work pashtun and the guinness book of world records, 24 hours and 18 minutes he spoke against the 1957 civil rights bill. we remember strom thurmond today as one of the last of the jim crow demagogues. and he
CSPAN
Dec 30, 2012 4:15pm EST
america working-class couples, a lead couples, and talk about a couple of them now. this chapters about the hook up culture. i can't quite gauge the age of this crowd, and the last couple days talking to college students all i knew i didn't have to explain the hook up culture but you never know. let's just say in short end, are having in drug division to an relationships without a long-term commitment. it doesn't mean sex or 1-night stand, or have commitments, more that you are loosely connected. my first chapter follows a group of girls who are elite business school girls who talk in ways that my mother would have killed me and locked me in a closet of i talked the way they do about sex. nonetheless i was perfectly seeking out girls who are sexually aggressive. most people see women entirely as victims in the oak up culture but i have a different view of it. based on a study done by two professors who were my age and camped out in a college dorm for four years, years they lived in a college dorm. imagine doing that. what they discovered was even though these girls had complaints
CSPAN
Dec 23, 2012 5:00pm EST
health talks about list teens in north america and the effort by covenant health to help them. mayor cory booker participates in the discussion and it is about 45 minutes. [applause] >> 84 being here. we won to get to write to it. let's talk about why you decided to be a part of the project? >> i have known cavanaugh long time. with our entire one attorney together. government house is put to work in new jersey has a heart and spirit and sold it does much more for our city knowing about you and covenant house i felt very privileged to write the foreword because it would recognize the fact my dad would have been homeless himself. board to a single mother, very poor. and even more so. my dad was po. [laughter] he could not afford the other two letters. [laughter] but through his extraordinary love his family kept him on a trajectory forward. he was able to put first semester's tuition but it is a conspiracy of love makes me to i am today but it starts with the young people. what bothers me is he talks so dramatically in a negative fashion and we don't realize everyone end was of a chil
CSPAN
Dec 23, 2012 10:00pm EST
nothing with him. but he had one thing nobody had in america. it was extremely quality which was the knowledge of how to die so. there was no silk industry in this country at that time. they did not know how to make machinery, a diet, have the tools, everything was trial and error to create the silk industry. it was our industrial revolution how we get in on the trade? there's so much money to be made in silk. it is hard to appreciate what it meant to the culture back then. before the age of synthetic fabrics and designers fabric was fashion and silk was the ultimate in style to represent prestige, prosperity, a success. america wanted its own silk industry. skinner would say nobody comes over with and ambition not to wear the silk dress. everybody wanted so. he came to the country with knowledge and was a pioneer in the industry. established its. a founding member of the american soccer association and he took that one in this bill into opportunity after opportunity. to the point* he had his own and silk mill. it was a prosperous an entire village stage village groups around it call
CSPAN
Dec 30, 2012 1:00pm EST
america, and to the republic for which it stands, one nation under god, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all. the presiding officer: the clerk will read a communication to the senate. the clerk: washington, d.c., december 30, 2012. to the senate: under the provisions of rule 1, paragraph 3, of the standing rules of the senate, i hereby appoint the honorable michael f. bennet, a senator from the state of colorado, to perform the duties of the chair. signed: patrick j. leahy, president pro tempore. the presiding officer: the majority leader. mr. reid: there will be an hour of debate on the galante nomination. at 2:00 p.m. there will be two roll call votes on confirmations of the nomination of carol greant to be assistant secretary at h.u.d. following those he votes thrib there will be a recess to allow for caucus meetings and the majority's meeting will begin at 3:00 today. would the chair announce the business of the day. the presiding officer: under the previous order, the leadership time is reserved. under the previous order, the senate will proceed to executive session to c
CSPAN
Dec 23, 2012 10:00am EST
the change and do nice to see obama's america are quite critical of president obama. trained to commit to these sell well? >> guest: they do because they serve right your wrong light as a counterpoint. many readers wish to buy and another results have a very active audience in a president obama has been reelected, i'm sure these publishers with conservative in prince or conservative and crime will continue to produce books that sell well because they will appeal to an audience that demands these books. >> host: bob minzesheimer can have you interviewed critical authors? >> guest: no. going back has not recently taken on exactly president obama. it's sort of interesting. who's ever in power in the white house, the opposite would of course i does better. a democratic in the white house tends to do better. then there's the conservative under president bush, they tend to do better. in fact, bush at one point being questioned about jobs are sent and says look what i'm doing for the book industry because there were so many books out critical of him come assorted middle of the second t
CSPAN
Dec 30, 2012 11:15pm EST
the united states of america. [laughter] also jim jones, bernie madoff and all of those claiming by and let your faith they can supervene the natural law and if there were such a thing as historical necessity, why in the world what we have to aide? portion of a human being but claimed they would save under us these ideologues and opportunist visionaries fugs seem to lead that they actually emerge from and right from the power and held by the mass confusion of the unbalanced group. the political impulse to the submission for all of those explained is more reasonable than out motive forms represented the government religion and culture may also be seen to the impulse buy those in extremists to seek out magic. the quiet of the psychic healer and energy for their past and the worshiper of the political strongman trade autonomy for magic. but the power of the magic feathers and beads and stimulus might the resurrection cannot be attempted without sacrifice. here the sacrifice of reason, the contemporary equivalent of dashing the flesh to make it rain. of course it implies a supranatural
CSPAN
Dec 16, 2012 4:15am EST
intense election system, so i went to taxi about america's role in all this. they do not support the democratic forces and each of quickly enough and others for not supporting our ally in the bar at. during the iran green revolution in 2009, many people criticized obama for not joining in the democratic forces. what is your basic take and how the u.s. handled itself and how the rebellions have been going on? >> that's an enormous question. there's ways in which we have -- i think i would be among those who would say we relate to be supportive of change in egypt. i think we should have been there quicker, supporting change. but that said, that might be unrealistic. but we did in iran was actually very well calibrated. but we have to understand is that from from the point of the view, for there to be will change it has to be indigenous. as american people, we have a role in everything and we want to fix it. sometimes the help is not wanted. in the case of serbia, the students in serbia and is a of madeleine albright was supported because word got to vent because one of their sticke
CSPAN
Dec 30, 2012 12:15am EST
a step that words. but it's a fact of how we deal with things. the greatest challenge in america when you look at the statistics in and crime, the kids that do not learn to read have not a slight factor but an overwhelming factor that they are going to spend a lot of time in jail. this is a national challenge for all of us, but the other aspect is, what is relevant to kids today? you can hardly dictate to relevance that there are aspects of the imagination that people seek out. sometimes in the worst kinds of circumstances, the greatest kind of joy is sought. i saw a demonstration of this that seems really odd and it applies to the book from another visual medium. a nonprofit organization gave a colony of people living in the country of lebanon that they were refugees and therefore in a camp, all the kids a small automatic camera and they took pictures. they were astonished that every single picture, almost without exception, kids by instinct chose someone smiling, something funny. there is a great, as sesame street is found, a great kind of appeal of a new world that people want
CSPAN
Dec 25, 2012 9:15am EST
-renowned heart doctor who had an incredible things for america. to make a long story short, he sent general david petraeus and e-mail landon ten minutes got back to me and we had for the next three months general david petraeus, people basically had gone in and worked, the letters had been written to basically create a justification, an exception. three days ago he will be laid to rest in darlington. [applause] >> did dog company receive any proper recognition for what they did? >> i am so pleased many of the family and people that i know very personally are here. bob, you were a member of george company 3 one in the chosen reservoir. part of a book i wrote called give me tomorrow, you were a machine gunner and it is an honor to have you here. like george company, for the most part dog company hasn't received as much recognition as they deserve. they received a presidential citation for their actions at pointe du hoc, but hills 400 remains an open issue. they deserve a presidential citation for that action. they charged that hill and held against all odds. the last letter to tom, on
CSPAN
Dec 29, 2012 4:20pm EST
months before pearl harbor brought america into world war ii, he made the decision that he wanted to fight the war against them and went to england and enlisted as an officer candidate with the british army. he took with him porphyrins, another man who was a student at harvard who had recently graduated and they were doing what they could to help the cause. saving their liberties against the forces of market fascism. >> he was studying at harvard at the time. what was his life trajectory at that point? >> he liked his four brothers and they had grown up in new jersey together and vermont where his family had had property for quite a long time. several generations. he went to prep school at st. paul's school, where he was distinguished as a student and a student leader. like all his brothers, they went to harvard. he was a good writer, known as a good writer. and when he went to war, he kept journals and wrote one of the letters, which i have hunted out and explored the story of what happened when he went to war. and i knew growing up that he had been killed. he was still very well re
CSPAN
Dec 9, 2012 12:00am EST
dragged america and the world economy under their funeral pyre i realize sullivan had nothing kidding at all and instead of writing prophecy and disguised wisdom as whimsy and failed to include surefire ways not to get rich majoring -- or becoming a professional mandolin player, two of the most obvious ways of all if not becoming rich. first, believing anything that anybody at anytime says on wall street. and second, from my perspective most important come, investing as i did your entire life savings in a 401(k) run by aol-time warner. now as well as a contributing editor to the boat and the father of the lot of books he is co-author along with his long-suffering wife suzanne of two incredibly talented children, louise and extraordinary singer and musician who i hope will make it here this evening and sam, who is currently attending yale which bob tells me is a four year institution in either hartford or new haven. let me begin our discussion by pointing out the fitting miss of discussing my american revolution here on delancey st.. delancey is where prominent you cannot family who fl
CSPAN
Dec 10, 2012 6:30am EST
america to provide information it needs to buy a home, break down barriers, arbitrary areas, every american wants get him mortgage will have a lot of fruit and put on the path to get that loan approved. that was one of the drivers for the low doc, no doc years later. eliminate the final know him mortgage application process. much was made of wamu having a slogan like that. fanny had in the press release in 1994. they promise clear and flexible underlying standard. flexible under my standards is another word for loose lending. that's what they mean. affordable housing is another word for cross subsidies. that's what it means. fannie and freddie were famous for the cross subsidy, well documented by occiio and now fhfa. the one that really was probably the worst that really politicize fanny, bob talked about, open 25 partnership offices eventually grew to 50 something that would form long-term partnerships with cities, rural areas, underserved communities. really political offices. that was a huge cultural change that had not existed. notwithstanding the rhetoric and the noble soundin
CSPAN
Dec 25, 2012 8:45pm EST
intelligence officer for latin america which is a tree or four-star military equivalent but it's a pretty substantial position and i had the responsibility for all of latin america and cuba and the analytical side of intelligence. estimate what does that mean? >> i was not a field operative. i didn't go out and conduct espionage or meet foreign agents. i was basically most of my career at the headquarters in virginia i had the national intelligence estimates, quite a few on cuba over the years, and many of the other latin american countries. >> before we get into fidel castro and the regime how did you get interested in that kind of work? senate i was a student at georgetown university where i taught for about 25 years as an adjunct and i'm teaching now with the university of miami, but i was attracted to the foreign service school at georgetown and it was a time when a lot of us, my generation were inspired by jack kennedy's asked not speech, asked not what your country can do for you but what you can do for your country. i devoted a long time, 35 years to national service. >> were you r
CSPAN
Dec 9, 2012 4:00pm EST
people in america where they talk about how they kind of crony capitalism took over the natural capitalism. just let it loose again. everybody gets a fair shake. everything will work all right. being able to see something, a system about using gives. reproduce itself. [inaudible] [inaudible] that rather than the market. >> a very appropriate question on halloween. you put that very well. it out. >> it's a great question. i think some of the problems on the left of that we look forward to crises as if that's what delegitimize the system. all that happens in a crisis is that people want to fix it. it suddenly looks like bush looks good now. he's stable. let's compare to the early days of bush. in the same thing with this question. it's as if america is in decline. let's make it number one again. that was very important in the auto industry in the late 70's when volcker was smashing the working class. the state was doing this. a lot of workers were thinking in terms of how we make american number one again. i think one of the issues this people have to come to see that capitalism i
CSPAN
Dec 16, 2012 8:00am EST
inherited which was previously nobody as the united states of america. [laughter] see also jim jones, bernie madoff and all those claiming by intellect or faith they can supervene the natural laws. if there was such a thing as historical necessity, why in the world would we have to aid it? must one not question at least theceps of proportion of a human being who proclaimed they will save it under us the seas cease to rise? these idealogues, op to have tunists, walks and thugs seem to lead, but they actually emerge for and ride for power impelled by the massed confusion of the imbalanced group. the political impulse to submission for all it is explained in its outmoded forms may also be seen, aligned to the impulse -- [inaudible] the quiet of the psychic healer and energy therapist, bloodless surgeon and the worshiper of the political strong band each trade autonomy for magic. but the power of the magic feathers, the magic beans, the stimulus -- like the resurrection of tinker bell -- cannot be attempted without sacrifice. here the sacrifice of reason. the contemporary equivalent of g
CSPAN
Dec 23, 2012 6:30am EST
during the american revolution. in fact the first place is what discusses here in america, even -- being opposed to slavery itself was remarkable. it's only in the western only in the 18th century that you have an abolition movement. people actually questioning the morality of slavery. so to me, jefferson was remarkable in that he actually questioned the system and had enough empathy to realize that slaves freed would be so angry at the way they were treated that it might actually rebel. i don't know if you want swedish know, i mean, jefferson was wrong about the blacks because when they were freed, there was no general rebellion after 1895. there was no mass slaughter of former masters. jefferson throughout his life, the revolutionary war was, it was a bit of a shock to him because a number of slaves ran off and joined the british to get the freedom. and he never forgave him for that, and that overrode the loyalty that many more slaves adjourned to the american cause. it overrode the fact that, well first of i should mention, george washington integrated the american army in 1775 blogsp
CSPAN
Dec 25, 2012 10:00am EST
maybe you'd rather think of something from the america of that area roughly, maybe a little bit earlier, the great depression, to get an image in your mind of the great depression. if you're having trouble, think of it tired him a worried looking at another stare off into the distance with a ragamuffin child leaning on each shoulder. can you find that famous iconic image in your mind? that image by dorothea lange called migrant mother that has come to symbolize the great depression. the images you've conjured up in your mind have been black and white. very, very likely. so i'd like you to do the same exercise but think of japanese imprisonments. think of the imprisonment of japanese americans during the war. so what are you picturing? does it look like this? a bunch of young, japanese-american grossing promoters dancing? this is a photograph taken by a government photographer at the granada relocation center, also known as the macho in 1943. so if this is that which you had in mind, what's different about it? well, it's a photo of young american citizen to being a celebrating th
CSPAN
Dec 30, 2012 10:00pm EST
then i looked up from much money they get in america. it turns out they are paid by the line. the highest pay your at the time was "the new yorker" paying $10 a line. you can see why there is not a huge line at the career fair i was getting $100 a plum no matter how long. so all i had to do was to right the fourth line or even better the to line poem. any time a wanted to get the buzz for working as the top dollar in your field. [laughter] i would write to the two line poem. when former senator bentsen named secretary of treasury groot a poem about his relations with special interest groups. the man is known for teetwo in texas that is how they do business. $50 a line. when a college transcript was pleased with no affect on the campaign i did a pall on the campaign that was a oblivious lee on he sales with marks not quite as good as quayle's. [laughter] the people who my family unfortunately call a real poet we call them the sanskrit crowd many of those members of the international "deadline poet" organization. there are two of us the other members used poetry would appear on the
CSPAN
Dec 9, 2012 10:30am EST
which the wall street dragged america and the world's economy went to their fleming funeral pyre, i realized that sullivan had not been getting in all. instead he had been writing prophecy. he disguised wisdom as wednesday . pell to include among his sure-fire ways not to get rich such as a maturing in anything with the word medieval and it or becoming a professional mandolin player, two of the most obvious ways of not becoming rich. first, leaving anything to anybody at any time. second from my perspective investing as i did your entire life savings in a retirement run by a yellow time warner. now, as well as contributing editor in the fallout of a sextet of books he is co-author along with his patient long-suffering wife suzanne f2 incredibly talented -- talented children. louise, sam as attending yale. a four year institution. let me begin our discussion by putting out, the american revolution here on dentistry. the bill and seas were a promising new gun family fled to england and ireland and 16th century. a branch of the family subsequently emigrated to new york where they becam
CSPAN
Dec 29, 2012 10:00am EST
taught initially at the university of vienna. he was jewish. city left turn or to permit him to america , and his economics became more popular never as popular as milton friedman, but certainly a heroic figure in my book. one of his students -- close associates won the nobel prize in economics in 1974. so he is an important character in my book. >> what does that mean? >> well, the austrian school is one of two major free-market schools of economics. the other school is the chicago school the milton friedman and george stevens developed in the 60's. and this is a more hard core school that advocates the gold standard. very suspicious of intervention, the central banks, particularly the austrian business cycle is really important because they basically say the manipulation of interest rates by the federal reserve can only have disastrous effects. a boom bust cycle that is unsustainable or a boom that is unsustainable. so it did not surprise austrian economists that the real-estate boom could not last and have the macroeconomics facts. it. >> paul sleazy. >> i have of a big chapter on ma
CSPAN
Dec 17, 2012 1:00am EST
. slavery was legal in all of the british colonies and all of north america at the end of the 18th century, and gradually, northern states and northeast and mid an lat tick states began to abolish slavely, but i learned it was a gradual process. it took a long time. what we discoveredded there were laves in new jersey in 1860, and most of the states that abolished slavery between 1780 and 1804, the period we customarily looked at, had to do it again later in the 19th century because there's so much ambiguity as to what the road to slavery to frame -- freedom was. thinking about that, i tried to then step back and say, well, if that's the case, what's it mean for us to understand the courses of the emancipation in the united states, and the notion of sectionalism between freedom and slavery that organizes our understanding of american political history so i end up arguing in one of the essays of the book that slavery is national, that slaves -- communities of run away slaves should be understood as what we call maroons, fugitive slave communities, and that the links between people o
CSPAN
Dec 3, 2012 5:30am EST
cell all across america and no family pays a jews for anything. > > these kids are getting strong.> > and now at hsn.com or at a to st. jude to your purchase to date. y. [commercial] [commercial] pfft [reading] >>host: of a football fan shop where we have a wonderful treks up our sleeve, this is the body below and what you have got is this great full-size body polo and this is great for sleeping i use a body blow every night we have covered it with your favorite team at graphic great care but then there is a great extra feature which and watch what happens. not only can fold up but it even does have the closures on this so you can lock it in place. you could open it to have two people share at inhabit to have for yourself, this is a great gift idea and a wonderful way to add your collection today is an hsn exclusive and this is a very quick presentation we will show you the teams that are here but we do have everygle team still available and if you have been struggling to find something for your team, this is a great choice for you this morning. >>guest: these are great the youth
CSPAN
Dec 30, 2012 3:00pm EST
good for america? can you afford to retire? the wall street fix getting me into wall street and economics, and i was interested in the housing crisis, the sub prime. the victims of sub prime were prime borrowers, not sub prime borrowers. getting into that, i saw the same patterns that i saw in offshoring, the burden shift on retirement, and i said, wait a minute, there's a story here about the american middle class. what happened to them. actually, it didn't start with the title, "who stole the american dream," but "the dream at risk" because everybody knew there was a problem. it was only as i got into it i discovered more and more things that i realized it was not market forces or technology. this was not globalization. what was happening is american politics and american economics were working against the middle class. people did this. we decided that if you look at other countries like germany, their middle class is in better shape doing better trading against the world. their companies are making money, and things heard that were not impossible, not possible in america, are
CSPAN
Dec 8, 2012 5:00pm EST
a crucial moment in his career and an important crucial moment in america's history. the big themes that you see in the speech and the broader story working through the election are kind of i think of four that i will be focusing on. i will be brief on each of them to give enough time for questions. first off, the obvious background of the cold war and a new style of conservative vision of foreign policy that i will explain. directly related to that, there is an enormous divide within the republican party in 1952. that shouldn't surprise any of us obviously. this is always a very divided party the tensions within the republican party that the speech and election point to are important. the third thing that i think is perhaps most important is the american tradition of populism for and what richard nixon is doing to the populist tradition in this speech and for what the election and the fourth and final thing is the style of politics nixon developed. the subtitle of the book is about the rocking, socking the election of 1952 and that is nixon's conception of politics, it should be ab
CSPAN
Dec 9, 2012 8:00pm EST
war which was contained completely within libya, granted america and certainly europe had tremendous financial interests. my question for you, really, is what are the future political consequences of our having acted in internal affairs in this country, and what type of precedent has this set? >> okay. excellent question. i would actually answer that first by saying that the united states and west was not a neutral party in libya, and, in fact, from the moment that the sanctions were lifted, particularly, the u.n. sanctions, and then the arms embargo in 2004, a flood of weaponry came into libya. most of it was over a billion dollars, which, in absolute terms, not that great, but relative to what was there before and what the purposes of what it was used for created a -- i would say an unfair playing field. you couldn't say that we were -- there was not a neutral issue as far as we were concerned. that process, as i argue in the book, was very much tieded to the whole issue of not -- not putting accountability in place for, you know, what we would get and what gadhafi could not do as
CSPAN
Dec 25, 2012 12:00pm EST
laws but there were also very strong isolationist sentiment in america. and even george marshall, who was chief military advisor to franklin roosevelt said, how can we send all these weapons to england if they're going to surrender to the british in a matter of weeks, and we end up fighting the germans? we will be charging into the face of our own weapons. but even though the operation was secret, it became headlines of course when it happened around the world. and everyone knew about it. and roosevelt and marshall were very, very effected by this. they thought if the british government can do this, they are serious. they are not going to negotiate with the germans. they're going to stay in this for as long as they possibly can. and it opened up the pathway for armaments to go to britain, which were very much needed and very much appreciated. >> brooke stoddard, when the official date of the so-called battle for britain, battle of britain? >> when were they? i think britain calls it july to the end of september, let's say. >> of 1940, which is essentially -- >> that's right. >> the se
CSPAN
Dec 8, 2012 11:00pm EST
everything a president in the united states of america. we really set out to do that. turns out we forgot dwight d. eisenhower. >> that's right. >> the book was printed. we get copies of the book. and in no one out. it was a fairly important. >> arguably more important and millard fillmore. >> i'll read sexual reproduction >> biological means by which man create other smaller man through the use of an intermediary. the man places his reproductive organ into a cavity provided by the intermediary and transfers of volume of genetic material into the receptacle. a tiny capsule except the man's genetic material and stores it in a larger oval shaped holding area within the intermediaries midsection. prior to this muzzle the intermediary promises to alert the progenitor when the little man is ready. working, eating, sleeping, and socializing to relieve stress. then the little man's completion , in some cases the intermediary malfunctions and accidently creates a new bill intermediary. we don't feel this way in real life. [laughter] >> yes, we do. >> i do. >> one more. >> yes. we have amer
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